Wycombe Abbey School Admission

11pluslogo11+ Exam 

(next ISEB 11+ test date is 16-17 Jan. 2017)

Girls should be registered with the school TWO YEARS before entry. This is done by submitting a registration form and the registration fee (£200 as of 2016).

In the Autumn term one year before entry a preliminary assessment is carried out at Wycombe Abbey. This is composed of a computer test of verbal, non-verbal and mathematical reasoning. There will also be an individual interview, and girls will take part in group activities with other candidates to see their ability to work with others. A headmaster’s report is also requested at this stage to gauge the candidate’s school performance.

After assessment day, offers of places will be made. A conditional offer means that the candidate will be offered a firm place upon their successful completion of the second stage written tests taken in the following January.

11+ tests will include a test in Maths, English (Reading and Writing) and Science.

Topics tested in Maths are according to the National Curriculum, although of course will vary in difficulty. They are as follows:

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MATHEMATICS  (∑)

Year 5 programme of study

Number – number and place value

Pupils should be taught to:

  • read, write, order and compare numbers to at least 1,000,000 and determine the value of each digit
  • count forwards or backwards in steps of powers of 10 for any given number up to 1,000,000
  • interpret negative numbers in context, count forwards and backwards with positive and negative whole numbers, including through 0
  • round any number up to 1,000,000 to the nearest 10, 100, 1,000, 10,000 and 100,000
  • solve number problems and practical problems that involve all of the above
  • read Roman numerals to 1,000 (M) and recognise years written in Roman numerals.

Number – addition and subtraction

Pupils should be taught to:

  • add and subtract whole numbers with more than 4 digits, including using formal written methods (columnar addition and subtraction)
  • add and subtract numbers mentally with increasingly large numbers
  • use rounding to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, levels of accuracy
  • solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.

Number – multiplication and division

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify multiples and factors, including finding all factor pairs of a number, and common factors of 2 numbers
  • know and use the vocabulary of prime numbers, prime factors and composite (non-prime) numbers
  • establish whether a number up to 100 is prime and recall prime numbers up to 19
  • multiply numbers up to 4 digits by a one- or two-digit number using a formal written method, including long multiplication for two-digit numbers
  • multiply and divide numbers mentally, drawing upon known facts
  • divide numbers up to 4 digits by a one-digit number using the formal written method of short division and interpret remainders appropriately for the context
  • multiply and divide whole numbers and those involving decimals by 10, 100 and 1,000
  • recognise and use square numbers and cube numbers, and the notation for squared (²) and cubed (³)
  • solve problems involving multiplication and division, including using their knowledge of factors and multiples, squares and cubes
  • solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division and a combination of these, including understanding the meaning of the equals sign
  • solve problems involving multiplication and division, including scaling by simple fractions and problems involving simple rates.

Number – fractions (including decimals and percentages)

Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and order fractions whose denominators are all multiples of the same number
  • identify, name and write equivalent fractions of a given fraction, represented visually, including tenths and hundredths
  • recognise mixed numbers and improper fractions and convert from one form to the other and write mathematical statements > 1 as a mixed number [for example, 2/5 + 4/5 = 6/5 = 1 1/5 ]
  • add and subtract fractions with the same denominator, and denominators that are multiples of the same number
  • multiply proper fractions and mixed numbers by whole numbers, supported by materials and diagrams
  • read and write decimal numbers as fractions [for example, 0.71 = 71/100 ]
  • recognise and use thousandths and relate them to tenths, hundredths and decimal equivalents
  • round decimals with 2 decimal places to the nearest whole number and to 1 decimal place
  • read, write, order and compare numbers with up to 3 decimal places
  • solve problems involving number up to 3 decimal places
  • recognise the per cent symbol (%) and understand that per cent relates to ‘number of parts per 100’, and write percentages as a fraction with denominator 100, and as a decimal fraction
  • solve problems which require knowing percentage and decimal equivalents of 1/2 , 1/4 ,  1/5, 2/5 , 4/5 and those fractions with a denominator of a multiple of 10 or 25.

Measurement

Pupils should be taught to:

  • convert between different units of metric measure [for example, kilometre and metre; centimetre and metre; centimetre and millimetre; gram and kilogram; litre and millilitre]
  • understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints
  • measure and calculate the perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes in centimetres and metres
  • calculate and compare the area of rectangles (including squares), including using standard units, square centimetres (cm²) and square metres (m²), and estimate the area of irregular shapes
  • estimate volume [for example, using 1 cm³ blocks to build cuboids (including cubes)] and capacity [for example, using water]
  • solve problems involving converting between units of time
  • use all four operations to solve problems involving measure [for example, length, mass, volume, money] using decimal notation, including scaling.

Geometry – properties of shapes

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify 3-D shapes, including cubes and other cuboids, from 2-D representations
  • know angles are measured in degrees: estimate and compare acute, obtuse and reflex angles
  • draw given angles, and measure them in degrees (°)
  • identify:
    • angles at a point and 1 whole turn (total 360°)
    • angles at a point on a straight line and half a turn (total 180°)
    • other multiples of 90°
    • use the properties of rectangles to deduce related facts and find missing lengths and angles
    • distinguish between regular and irregular polygons based on reasoning about equal sides and angles.

Geometry – position and direction

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify, describe and represent the position of a shape following a reflection or translation, using the appropriate language, and know that the shape has not changed.

Statistics

Pupils should be taught to:

  • solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph
  • complete, read and interpret information in tables, including timetables.

 

Year 6 programme of study

Number – number and place value

Pupils should be taught to:

  • read, write, order and compare numbers up to 10,000,000 and determine the value of each digit
  • round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy
  • use negative numbers in context, and calculate intervals across 0
  • solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above.

Number – addition, subtraction, multiplication and division

Pupils should be taught to:

  • multiply multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long multiplication
  • divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long division, and interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions, or by rounding, as appropriate for the context
  • divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit number using the formal written method of short division where appropriate, interpreting remainders according to the context
  • perform mental calculations, including with mixed operations and large numbers
  • identify common factors, common multiples and prime numbers
  • use their knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations involving the 4 operations
  • solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why
  • solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • use estimation to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, an appropriate degree of accuracy.

Number – Fractions (including decimals and percentages)

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination
  • compare and order fractions, including fractions >1
  • add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions
  • multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form [for example, 1/4 × 1/2 = 1/8 ]
  • divide proper fractions by whole numbers [for example, 1/3 ÷ 2 = 1/6 ]
  • associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents [for example, 0.375] for a simple fraction [for example, 3/8 ]
  • identify the value of each digit in numbers given to 3 decimal places and multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100 and 1,000 giving answers up to 3 decimal places
  • multiply one-digit numbers with up to 2 decimal places by whole numbers
  • use written division methods in cases where the answer has up to 2 decimal places
  • solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy
  • recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages, including in different contexts.

Ratio and proportion

Pupils should be taught to:

  • solve problems involving the relative sizes of 2 quantities where missing values can be found by using integer multiplication and division facts
  • solve problems involving the calculation of percentages [for example, of measures and such as 15% of 360] and the use of percentages for comparison
  • solve problems involving similar shapes where the scale factor is known or can be found
  • solve problems involving unequal sharing and grouping using knowledge of fractions and multiples.

Algebra

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use simple formulae
  • generate and describe linear number sequences
  • express missing number problems algebraically
  • find pairs of numbers that satisfy an equation with 2 unknowns
  • enumerate possibilities of combinations of 2 variables.

Measurement

Pupils should be taught to:

  • solve problems involving the calculation and conversion of units of measure, using decimal notation up to 3 decimal places where appropriate
  • use, read, write and convert between standard units, converting measurements of length, mass, volume and time from a smaller unit of measure to a larger unit, and vice versa, using decimal notation to up to 3 decimal places
  • convert between miles and kilometres
  • recognise that shapes with the same areas can have different perimeters and vice versa
  • recognise when it is possible to use formulae for area and volume of shapes
  • calculate the area of parallelograms and triangles
  • calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units, including cubic centimetres (cm³) and cubic metres (m³), and extending to other units [for example, mm³ and km³].

Geometry – properties of shapes

Pupils should be taught to:

  • draw 2-D shapes using given dimensions and angles
  • recognise, describe and build simple 3-D shapes, including making nets
  • compare and classify geometric shapes based on their properties and sizes and find unknown angles in any triangles, quadrilaterals, and regular polygons
  • illustrate and name parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference and know that the diameter is twice the radius
  • recognise angles where they meet at a point, are on a straight line, or are vertically opposite, and find missing angles.

Geometry – position and direction

Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe positions on the full coordinate grid (all 4 quadrants)
  • draw and translate simple shapes on the coordinate plane, and reflect them in the axes.

Statistics

Pupils should be taught to:

  • interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems
  • calculate and interpret the mean as an average.

 

(Source:  www.gov.uk  / Department for Education, National Curriculum in England )

Information also taken from the ISEB, the makers and publishers of the 11+ and 13+ exams (Independent Schools Examinations Board). You can find detailed information on the Maths Syllabus for 11+, 13+ and Scholarship exams here.

english

ENGLISH

A test in reading comprehension and writing will be given.

READING COMPREHENSION passages can be taken from either fiction or non-fiction texts. Questions will aim to assess a student’s ability to offer personal opinion and response to a text, to explain writer’s choice of vocabulary, to explain vocabulary in context, to use the text as evidence for ideas and answers etc.

COMPOSITION tasks will assess a candidate’s ability to think creatively and structure their ideas in an effective way.

The writing task may use any of the following prompts as a stimulus:

• imaginative/story writing

• factual/personal description

• writing involving discussion/opinion/memory

• a book review

• a picture stimulus.

Impressive pieces of writing will show an ability to use literary devices, interesting descriptive phrases and syntax to achieve the best effect.
science

SCIENCE

The 11+ Science curriculum covers the following areas:

Energy, movement and forces:

a. the effect of changes in electrical circuits

b. the properties and behaviour of light and sound in order to describe and explain familiar effects

c. combinations of forces

Material behaviour

a. reversible and non-reversible changes which occur in the environment

b. how changes can be used to create new and useful materials

Life and living things

a. the structure and function of key human body systems, including reproduction

b. the structure, function, life cycle and growth of flowering plants and how these grow and are used around the world

c. the benefits of micro-organisms and the harm they can cause

The environment, Earth and solar system

a. how plants and animals are interdependent and are diverse and adapted to their environment as a result of evolution

b. how scientific and technological developments affect the physical and living worlds

c. practical ways in which science can contribute to a more sustainable future

d. how time measurement relates to day and night and the Earth’s place in the solar system.

 

Information has been taken from www.iseb.co.uk

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